Agenda

08:30

08:50

REFORMING PRISONS

09:00

  • Key challenges for the settler state

Speakers

Hannah McGlade

Member, Associate Professor

UN Permanent Forum for Indigenous Peoples, Curtin University

09:30

  • Helping Indigenous women on the inside with their health and wellbeing 
  • Assisting Indigenous women in the areas of bail, decarceration, parole, bluecards, deportation, and more. 
  • Preparing Indigenous women for a strong future after leaving a correctional facility 

Speakers

Debbie Kilroy

CEO

Sisters Inside

10:00

  • Ensuring that the option of Indigenous representation is enshrined in regulation 
  • Training Indigenous staff to deliver culturally informed support and helpful advice

Speakers

Jarrod Farrelly

ATC Case Manager

Circular Head Aboriginal Corporation

Kristy Wilson

Indigenous Justice Program

Circular Head Aboriginal Corporation

10:30

10:55

  • Moving away from viewing Indigenous women through a criminogenic lens 
  • Engaging in practices of dignity to transform lives  
  • Turning justice research into practice to mitigate institutional trauma

Speakers

Jill Faulkner

Independent Consultant and Researcher on Indigenous Women’s Justice

11:25

  • Understanding the relationship between health, education, child protection, police, courts and correction systems 
  • What practical steps can be taken to untie systemic disadvantage and improve justice outcomes

Speakers

Marlene Longbottom

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

University of Wollongong

11:55

  • Reforming solitary confinement practices, including prison quarantining  
  • Finding alternatives to strip searches that traumatize inmates and staff 
  • Creating a more regular visiting program to improve prisoner wellbeing 
  • The OPCAT - Setting new standards for the treatment of Indigenous Australian prisoners 

Speakers

Dr. Jocelyn Jones

Research Fellow

National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University

Hannah McGlade

Member, Associate Professor

UN Permanent Forum for Indigenous Peoples, Curtin University

Steven Caruana

Coordinator

Australia OPCAT Network

12:40

INTERACTIVE YARNING SESSIONS

01:30

Yarning Session One 
Closing gaps in service delivery to prevent Indigenous people falling into the criminal punishment system 
Naomi Murphy, Aboriginal Ex-Offender Employment Project Worker, Woor-Dungin’s Criminal Record Discrimination Project 
 
Yarning Session Two 
How can we improve Indigenous health justice outcomes?

Speakers

Naomi Murphy

Aboriginal Ex-Offender Employment Project Worker

Woor-Dungin’s Criminal Record Discrimination Project

YOUTH JUSTICE

02:20

  • Confronting the contradiction that sees Aboriginality listed as both a criteria for support and an indicator of risk 
  • Proposing better child protection alternatives that will simultaneously assist and protect vulnerable communities 

Speakers

Thelma Schwartz

Principal Legal Officer

Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Service

02:50

  • Empowering Elders and community leaders who have an intimate understanding of their community 
  • Making sure that, when separation from parents is necessary, care is handed over to extended family within community 
  • Creating political momentum to raise the age and break the cycle of suffering 

Speakers

Aunty Rieo Ellis

Social Support Worker

Grandmothers Against Removals, Victoria

03:20

03:45

  • Finding concrete ways to link both recent and intergenerational trauma to behavior  
  • Deciding how trauma should impact the sentencing and treatment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in prison 

Speakers

Rebecca Cort

Senior Advisor

Australian Childhood Foundation

04:15

  • Scrutinizing current bail laws and proposing alternatives 
  • How can we support Indigenous youth while current laws still exist? 

Speakers

Naomi Murphy

Aboriginal Ex-Offender Employment Project Worker

Woor-Dungin’s Criminal Record Discrimination Project

05:00

08:30

REFORMING LAW ENFORCEMENT

08:50

09:00

  • Is Law Enforcement Reform Possible?  
  • Examining movements Black Power in the 1960s to Black Lives Matter in 2020s

Speakers

Professor Chris Cunneen

Professor of Criminology

University of Technology Sydney, Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education

09:30

  • Improving Indigenous justice outcomes by listening and handing over power to community 
  • What are the mistakes that police have made in the past and how can we do better? 
  • Learning from police initiatives that have worked, from Bourke to the South Coast 

Speakers

Greg Moore

Commander South Coast Police District

NSW Police Force

10:00

  • Uncovering systemic problems with the police
  • Proposing solutions to reduce trauma and encourage rehabilitation 

Speakers

Amanda Porter

Senior Fellow (Indigenous Programs)

Melbourne Law School, The University of Melbourne

10:30

SELF DETERMINATION

11:00

  • Developing a centralized Indigenous justice body with community elected officials 
  • Providing consultation to government and justice initiatives that reflects community sentiment 
  • How can other states build similar self-determining platforms? 

Speakers

Lewis Brown

Executive Officer

VACSAL, Aboriginal Justice Caucus

11:30

  • Defining the role of an Aboriginal Legal Service as both a service provider and social justice advocate 
  • Representing community in dealings with government 
  • To what degree is and should our work be governed by the Closing the Gap targets? 
  • Presenting examples of effective service delivery that has contributed to positive Indigenous justice outcomes

Speakers

Sarah Hopkins

Managing Solicitor, Justice Projects

Aboriginal Legal Service NSW/ACT

12:00

  • What does success look like from a community perspective when tackling justice reform? 
  • Appreciating local differences and common principles in establishing community led programs across three different community organisations
  • How can government help community organisations achieve self-determination? 

Speakers

Deirdre Howard-Wagner

Senior Fellow

College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU

12:30

  • Turning challenges into opportunities through strategic advocacy 
  • Determining the legislative changes that will have the greatest impact on Indigenous justice 
  • Ensuring that advocacy is practical to create the greatest chance of change  
  • Working with a range of stakeholders while staying strong to your principles

Speakers

Lawrence Moser

Associate Director, Aboriginal Services

Victoria Legal Aid

01:00

INTERACTIVE YARNING SESSIONS

01:55

Yarning Session One 
Reforming taser regulation and culture  
  
Yarning Session Two 
How can we ensure that ACCOs are best serving community?

02:45

JUSTICE REINVESTMENT

03:00

  • Redirecting funds to create employment, education, and wellbeing opportunities for Indigenous men, women, and youth prisoners 
  • Using an evidenced-based decision-making process to inform funding decisions 
  • Working with government and community stakeholders to make tailored reinvestment decisions 

Speakers

Naomi Murphy

Aboriginal Ex-Offender Employment Project Worker

Woor-Dungin’s Criminal Record Discrimination Project

Graham Pattel

Managing Director

Wulli Wulli Indigenous Disability Services

Margaret Hure

Wulli Wulli Indigenous Disability Services

Desmond Campbell

First Nations Practice Lead

Social Ventures Australia

04:00

  • Understanding the connection between clinical and social health
  • Aligning health and justice sectors to provide holistic services and support to Indigenous Australians 
  • Challenging prisoners’ exclusion from the Medicare Billings Scheme 

Speakers

Dallas Hure

CEO

Northern Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health Alliance

04:30

ENABLING CULTURAL SAFETY IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

 
2nd December 2021 | Melbourne
 
Every person has the right to feel safe when interacting with the justice system; physically safe, psychologically safe and emotionally safe.  Related to those areas of safety they also have the right to be safe in term of their identity – their gender, sexuality, ethnicity and culture.  Cultural safety is particularly important for people whose culture has been marginalised through institutional racism.  
 
In Australia, the intergenerational trauma caused by a historically prejudiced justice system has led to cultural confusion and lateral violence in most First Nation communities. Lateral violence describes the negative behaviours of oppressed groups towards each other as a result of internalising oppression. Lateral violence in Australia is identified with the colonial processes of disconnection from land, law/lore, culture and community which is an ongoing, intergenerational reality in the lives of First Nations people; it impacts negatively on health, wellbeing and organisational harmony.  
 
In order to ensure that the justice system is culturally safe and avoid having First Nations peoples experience racism, trauma and lateral violence, it’s important to adopt policies and processes which promote understanding of cultural issues, including cultural strengthening training programs for First Nations staff and cultural safety training for their non-indigenous colleagues.   
 
Key learning objectives
  • Understand why the justice system sets Indigenous people up to fail 
  • Discover how cultural programs can help break the cycle of Indigenous incarceration  
  • Identify where the justice system leads to lateral violence 
  • Learn how justice reform can help eliminate lateral violence 
  • Build cultural programs for Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff 

Workshop Agenda

Workshop Leaders